Collaboration Areas

View of Liverpool Collaboration area

What are Collaboration Areas?

Collaboration Areas are a new way for stakeholders to work together to deliver coordinated planning in locations that have great potential to grow their vibrancy, diversity and productivity, with improved employment and education opportunities, enhanced liveability and sustainability. They are led by the Commission over a 12-month period.

Why Collaboration Areas?

The Commission has identified Collaboration Areas because of their potential to grow into centres of increased productivity and innovation, attracting knowledge intensive jobs, creative industries, leading edge researchers, and unique places for people.

The Collaboration Area process transforms places by:

  • identifying and recognising the complex issues inhibiting growth and change;
  • bringing together multiple and diverse stakeholders to find practical solutions that are based on efficient, effective and coordinated planning and investment.

"The GSC is playing an invaluable role in expanding the way in which health and urban planning can be undertaken by government. This reimagining of planning can lead to improvements in the health and wellbeing of our communities – by improving access to health services, building healthy neighbourhoods and supporting better transport links and job opportunities."

Elizabeth Koff, Secretary NSW Health.

Where are the Collaboration Areas?

Map showing location of Collaboration Areas

Who is involved in the Collaboration Areas?

Each Collaboration Area involves a diverse range of stakeholders, relevant to the specific place and the challenges to be resolved. A Stakeholder Group, chaired by the relevant District Commissioner, typically includes the relevant council, key agencies such as Transport for NSW, Health Infrastructure, the Local Health District, Department of Education and tertiary education institutions.

What are the outcomes of the Collaboration Area process?

The Commission will work with each Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group to produce a Place Strategy. This will set out a vision for the area, identify impediments and opportunities, agree on priorities and identify projects and initiatives to deliver the vision. These elements are developed and agreed by Stakeholder Group members and build on consultations and studies previously completed by individual Group members.

The Place Strategies will be reported to the Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee for endorsement, following which they will be included in future updates of the District Plans. The Place Strategies will be implemented collaboratively by councils, state agencies, universities and other stakeholders.

"I wish to take the opportunity to thank the Greater Sydney Commission for including the University of Wollongong and the university sector more broadly in the recent Liverpool Collaboration Area planning process. ….. I know that it has provided deeper connections for UOW with the breadth of agencies active in Liverpool and a sharper understanding of the collaborative actions required to ensure Liverpool prospers as a major strategic centre and hub of innovation within NSW, for the benefit of all."

Mark Roberts, Senior Manager, Strategic Projects, University of Wollongong

Collaboration Areas 2017-18


The Liverpool Collaboration Area, one of three in the Western Parkland City, includes Liverpool’s Central Business District, the Warwick Farm precinct, the health and education precinct and nearby residential and industrial lands.

Map of Liverpool Collaboration Area

The key priority for the Liverpool Collaboration Area is to advance Liverpool City Centre as a metropolitan centre in the Western Parkland City. This involves consideration of planning proposals before Liverpool City Council, the opportunities presented by Western Sydney Airport and the existing health and education precinct, and activation and growth of the city centre around the Georges River.

The Liverpool Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group is chaired by Environment Commissioner, Roderick Simpson and includes representatives from Liverpool City Council, the University of Wollongong, Western Sydney University and state government agencies covering health, education, environment, planning, transport and emergency services.

Key issues

The Liverpool Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group has identified issues including transport and traffic constraints, the need to improve local amenity and the quality of shared public space, and the need to attract industry and create jobs in the area.

Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy

The Greater Sydney Commission and the Liverpool Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group are preparing a Place Strategy for the Liverpool Collaboration Area which will be finalised in mid-2018. The Place Strategy will document a shared vision and seven key objectives for the area along with priorities and actions to achieve the vision and address key issues.


The Greater Penrith Collaboration Area covers the Penrith Central Business District, the health and education precinct, and the tourism precinct from Penrith Lakes along the current length of the Great River Walk to the M4 Motorway. It is one of three Collaboration Areas identified in the Western Parkland City.

Map of Greater Penrith Collaboration Area

The Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group is chaired by Heather Nesbitt, Social Commissioner, and includes representatives from Penrith City Council, Penrith health and education precinct, The University of Sydney, Western Sydney University and state government agencies covering health, education, environment, planning, transport and emergency services. 

Key issues

The Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group has identified several issues that must be addressed so that Greater Penrith can achieve its full potential. These include flood management and evacuation issues, the need for infrastructure to support growth, improved connections in and around the city centre, and better urban amenity to help cool the city.

The Commission is working with the Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group to deliver a long-term strategy for resolving flood management and evacuation issues in Penrith. Resolving these issues is critical to future investment and growth within Greater Penrith and is an important first step in preparing a Place Strategy for the Collaboration Area.

The Commission expects the Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Place Strategy to be finalised in the second half of 2018.


The Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area is one of the largest and most comprehensive health and education precincts in Greater Sydney. It is one of three in the Eastern Harbour City and includes the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the University of Sydney, University of Technology Sydney, University of Notre Dame Sydney Campus, TAFE Ultimo, and several medical research institutions. The key priority of this Collaboration Area is to support the Area’s vitality and economic growth.

Map of Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area

The Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group is chaired by Eastern City District Commissioner, Maria Atkinson, and includes representatives from City of Sydney, Inner West Council, Sydney Business Chamber, Carriageworks, surrounding universities and state government agencies covering health, education, planning, environment, transport, finance and innovation.

The Stakeholder Reference Group includes four working sub-groups focusing on:

  • Developing a vision, narrative and branding for the Area.
  • Place making and enabling infrastructure.
  • Interactions between hospitals, businesses and universities.
  • Activation, healthy community and cultural life.

Key issues

The Camperdown- Ultimo Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group has identified several issues that must be addressed so that Camperdown- Ultimo can reach its full potential.  These include transport issues, housing affordability, loss of employment space for health, education, research, innovation and creative sectors, and the need for a global vision, brand and greater collaboration in the area.

The Commission is working with the Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group to understand projected growth in the area and to draft a vision and narrative for the Area that will form the basis of the Camperdown- Ultimo Collaboration Area Place Strategy.


The Randwick health and education Precinct is one of three Collaboration Areas in the Eastern Harbour City. It is strategically located between the Sydney Central Business District and Sydney Airport. It contains the health cluster of the University of NSW Kensington Campus, Prince of Wales public and private hospitals, the Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney Children’s Hospital and numerous research institutions.

The Randwick Collaboration Area process will support Randwick in becoming one of Australia’s leading centres for health and wellbeing. A key priority is to improve the integration of health, research, education and teaching to drive innovation and economic growth across the Area.

Map of Randwick Collaboration Area

The Randwick Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group is chaired by Eastern City District Commissioner, Maria Atkinson, and includes representatives from Randwick City Council, University of New South Wales, Australian Turf Club, AirBnB and state government agencies covering health, education, planning, environment, transport and housing.

Key issues

The Stakeholder Group for the Randwick Collaboration Area has identified a needs for public and active transport to support growth, and housing affordability, particularly for students and key workers.

The Commission and the Stakeholder Group are preparing a Place Strategy for the Randwick Collaboration Area that will be finalised in mid-2018, with a shared vision and key objectives for the area, along with priorities and actions to achieve the vision and address key issues.


The Rhodes East Collaboration Area is a demonstration project that complements the Rhodes East Planned Precinct being run by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment with City of Canada Bay Council. This Collaboration Area is in the Eastern Harbour City and includes land on the eastern side of the rail line, within walking distance of Rhodes train station.

The focus of the Rhodes East Collaboration Area is to investigate how sustainable utility infrastructure can be delivered across the Precinct. This includes low carbon/ high efficiency energy supply and recycled water.

The Rhodes East Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group is chaired by Eastern City District Commissioner, Maria Atkinson, and includes representatives from City of Canada Bay Council, Sydney Water, Sydney Olympic Park Authority and the NSW Department of Planning and Environment.

Key issues

The Rhodes East Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group has identified two key issues preventing the delivery of sustainable utilities in the Rhodes East Collaboration Area. These are the limitations of the planning framework in requiring strata schemes to connect to recycled water, and capacity constraints with the current water recycling plant at Sydney Olympic Park.

The Commission is facilitating discussion between stakeholders about how these issues might be resolved and is working with the Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group to investigate how existing regulatory frameworks can be used to encourage the uptake of sustainable utilities.

 

 

Downloads

Collaboration Area fact sheet May 2018 (PDF, 16 MB)